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The Peace Calendar Vol.2 No.11

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Toronto Peace Garden

anon — February 1984

On December 12, Toronto City Council approved the construction of a peace memorial to be built in Nathan Phillips Square. The idea was first conceived by Rev. Massey Lombardi, O.F.M., of the Archdiocese of Toronto, and was recommended to City Council by Toronto Mayor Art Eggleton. The specific events the memorial will commemorate are Toronto’s Sesquicentennial year and visits to Toronto by Queen Elizabeth and the Pope. However, the memorial has the much larger purpose of expressing the human desire for lasting peace in a world threatened by nuclear war. As shown in this photograph of a model of the memorial, its underlying objective is to represent human society in microcosm,but with elements (such as the destroyed roof) which suggest its fragility.

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