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Disarmament report still unavailable

Roy McFarlane — December 1984

OTTAWA — It is still not clear if Joe Clark’s disarmament report will ever be made public. Inquiries made to the press offices of both Mr. Clark’s ministry of External Affairs and the Prime Minister’s Office revealed little.

Vivian Taylor, in the press office of the Prime Minister, said that there was no information on when it may be released. While Louise de Lafayette, in Mr. Clark’s office, said that she had no information on whether or not the report will be released, she did say that Clark indicated that it will be used when the government holds its foreign policy review.

The foreign policy review, to be conducted shortly, will involve public participation, and will look at Canada’s current policies and any changes that the present government may undertake.

Mr. Clark’s disarmament report was compiled following puhlie meetings across Canada and private talks with diplomats and others outside of Canada. The meetings were held before the recent election campaign. at the request of Brian Mulroney. It is now up to the Prime Minister to decide whether or not to release the report.

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